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Archive for August 2007

Ruby is an open source, interpreted, object-oriented programming language created by Yukihiro Matsumoto, who chose the gemstone’s name to suggest “a jewel of a language.” Ruby is designed to be simple, complete, extensible, and portable. Developed mostly on Linux, Ruby works across most platforms, such as most Unix-based platforms, DOS, Windows, Macintosh, BeOS, and OS/2, for example. According to proponents, Ruby’s simple syntax(partially inspired by Ada and Eiffel), makes it readable by anyone who is familiar with any modern programming language.Ruby is considered similar to Smalltalk and Perl. The authors of the book Programming Ruby: The Pragmatic Programmer’s Guide, David Thomas and Andrew Hunt say that it is fully object-oriented, like Smalltalk, although more conventional to use, and as convenient as Perl, but fully object-oriented, which leads to better structured and easier-to-maintain programs. To be compliant with the principles of Extreme Programming (XP), Ruby allows portions of projects to be written in other languages if they are better suited.

Ruby has become extremely popular in Japan; it is sometimes said that, at the moment, although there are a huge number of Ruby programmers, most of them don’t speak English. That situation is expected to change, however: Hunt and Thomas predict that Ruby will undergo explosive growth between 2001 and 2002, and overtake Python within four years.

Nanotechnology, or, as it is sometimes called, molecular manufacturing, is a branch of engineering that deals with the design and manufacture of extremely small electronic circuits and mechanical devices built at the molecular level of matter. The Institute of Nanotechnology in the U.K. expresses it as “science and technology where dimensions and tolerances in the range of 0.1 nanometer(nm) to 100 nm play a critical role.” Nanotechnology is often discussed together with micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS), a subject that usually includes nanotechnology but may also include technologies higher than the molecular level.

There is a limit to the number of components that can be fabricated onto a semiconductor wafer or “chip.”. Traditionally, circuits have been etched onto chips by removing material in small regions. However, it is also possible in theory to build chips up, one atom at a time, to obtain devices much smaller than those that can be manufactured by etching. With this approach, there would be no superfluous atoms; every particle would have a purpose. Electrical conductors, called nanowires, would be only one atom thick. A logic gate would require only a few atoms. A data bit could be represented by the presence or absence of a single electron.

Nanotechnology holds promise in the quest for ever-more-powerful computers and communications devices. But the most fascinating (and potentially dangerous) applications are in medical science. So-called nanorobots might serve as programmable antibodies. As disease-causing bacteria and viruses mutate in their endless attempts to get around medical treatments, nanorobots could be reprogrammed to selectively seek out and destroy them. Other nanorobots might be programmed to single out and kill cancer cells.

Two concepts associated with nanotechnology are positional assemblyand self-replication. Positional assembly deals with the mechanics of moving molecular pieces into their proper relational places and keeping them there. Molecular robots are devices that do the positional assembly. Self-replication deals with the problem of multiplying the positional arrangements in some automatic way, both in building the manufacturing device and in building the manufactured product.


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Hi i'm Hari, heart break guy. I live at 12o 57’ 41.19” N 80o 14’ 32.20” E. I love blogging.

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